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How to Organize a Craft Room (and Keep It Neat!)

By Flow Wall
·
December 23, 2020




In a world where we seem to spend more of our time online than not, there are few things more satisfying than a little hands-on crafting. You get to let your creative juices flow, set your cares aside, and create something cool out of nothing.

Whether you give your creation to a friend, hang it on a wall, or (let’s be honest) let it sit in a stack on your dresser for six months, you’ve put your talents to use. And that’s worth a solid pat on the back!

But when the fun of your crafting is over, you might be left with a feeling of dread: Now it’s time to put all your supplies away. Eek. Where the heck do you store all of this stuff, anyway?

Check out our tips to learn how to organize a craft room—and actually keep it neat for more than a day or two.

Organizing Tips

Ready to organize your cluttered craft room? The task may seem overwhelming, but breaking it down into steps will help you tackle the beast. So let’s start with the basics. Here are our tried-and-true tips for putting together any craft room.

1. Add Hook and Panel Wall Storage

Short on space? Nothing’s more efficient than some hook and panel wall storage. Install yours for storing scissors, jars of pens and pencils, rulers, ribbons, tape, and more. The sky's the limit! You’ll love looking at your neatly organized wall storage, and it gives you easy access to all of your most-used tools.

2. Organize Tools by Craft

How do you categorize craft supplies when everything is thrown into random boxes or cluttering your desktop? There are plenty of methods touted by expert crafters, but allow us to suggest the best method, which is to organize your tools by craft, such as sewing, scrapbooking, knitting, etc. By choosing this method, you’ll be able to whip out everything you need in one fell swoop. Choose some clear containers or storage tubs, and you’re on your way.

3. Assign a Designated Spot for Everything

You know the saying that hangs in every high school classroom across America? “If you fail to plan, you plan to fail.” And as much as we hate to admit it, our teachers were right. If you don’t know where your craft supplies should go, then you’ll have a guaranteed mess on your hands when you’re done with a project. Eliminate the headache by designating a spot for every item.

4. Label Everything

Yes, we too once thought that label maker was a little over-the-top. But now? We totally get it. Labeling is a major game-changer when it comes to organization. Because even if you think you’ll remember where to put everything...you inevitably forget when it comes time to clean up. Enter: the labelmaker. You’ll never forget which items go where, and you’ll get such a sense of satisfaction gazing over your neatly labeled collection of craft supplies.

5. Leave Extra Space

If there’s anything we know about serious crafting, it’s that your craft supplies are going to grow exponentially over time. No matter how much of a minimalist you aim to be, you’ll slowly start collecting more stamps, more stickers, more yarn, and the like. So do your future self a solid: Leave extra space for those future craft supplies that are no doubt headed your way.


A versatile storage system will work wonders in your home
 

6. Opt for Cabinets

Cabinets are a must-have for anyone looking to organize a messy craft room. They’re a great way to make the room look pulled-together and conceal the stacks of paper, markers, ribbons, and whatever else may lie behind the door. Fortunately, today it’s easy to find craft cabinets to fit your home decor. Choose the right cabinets for your space, pair them with some shelving, and you’ll be wanting to hang out in your craft room just to admire its beauty.

Rules for Neatness

All right, you’ve conquered the craft catastrophe that once was. Now it’s time to keep it tidy for more than a few hours. So how do you sort art supplies when you’re regularly using the space? We’ve got all the answers.

1. Set a 5-Minute Tidy Timer

Hey, it works for your kids, and it can work for you, too. The 5-minute tidy timer may seem simple, but there’s a reason it’s so effective: Five minutes is short enough that you can stay motivated, but long enough to actually see a major difference in the space once the time is up. In fact, it’s so effective, you’ll probably start using it for every room in your house.

2. Plan a Deep-Clean Day

The 5-minute tidy timer will certainly help to keep major messes at bay. But it’s not a cure-all for every crafting mess. Sometimes, you need to dig a little deeper. Make sure your craft room stays as organized as possible by scheduling a deep-cleaning day on a regular basis. If you’re an Etsy superstar or true craft-addict, you may need to deep-clean once a week. If you’re only popping in the room a couple times a month, a monthly deep-clean should do the trick.

3. Don’t Save Things “Just in Case”

If Marie Kondo has taught us anything, it’s that you should never save things “just in case” you need it later on. Haven’t used it in 6 months? Kiss it goodbye. It may seem painful at first, but you’ll feel light as a feather once you’ve moved on. Odds are you won’t miss it a bit. And if you do? You can always borrow something similar from a friend, or go out and buy a new one. You probably won’t need to do the latter...so the benefits still outweigh the cost!

4. Declutter at Least Once a Year

Love spring cleaning? Feel an urge to declutter every New Year’s? Or maybe the fall season has you in the mood for a home refresh? In any case, choose a time once a year to tackle your craft room. You’ll be able to re-evaluate what you’re using, how to organize your craft room the best way, and what it’s time to give away.

Get Organized Today with Flow Wall

Don’t delay—let’s get your craft closet organized ASAP. You’ll be wondering why you didn’t get the job done sooner. And Flow Wall is here to help with all of your organizational needs for home and garage. Check out our cabinets and tool storage to transform your messy craft room into something fabulously organized.